Most famous cities of India

Most famous cities of India

India is a vast country that consists of many big and small states, cities and villages. So we have many famous and historical cities in India. Cities generally have extensive systems for housing, transportation, sanitation, utilities, land use, and communication. Their density facilitates interaction between people, government organizations and businesses, sometimes benefiting different parties in the process.

So here are some of the big and famous cities of India.

1. Delhi

Delhi is the officially the National Capital Territory of Delhi (NCT), is a city and a union territory of India containing New Delhi, the capital of India. It is bordered by the state of Haryana on three sides and by Uttar Pradesh to the east. The NCT covers an area of 1,484 square kilometers (573 sq mi). According to the 2011 census, Delhi’s city proper population was over 11 million, the second-highest in India after Mumbai, while the whole NCT’s population was about 16.8 million. Delhi’s urban area is now considered to extend beyond the NCT boundaries, and include the neighboring satellite cities of Ghaziabad, Faridabad, Gurgaon, and Noida in an area now called National Capital Region (NCR) and had an estimated 2016 population of over 26 million people, making it the world’s second-largest urban area according to the United Nations. As of 2016, recent estimates of the metro economy of its urban area have ranked Delhi either the most or second-most productive metro area of India. Delhi is the second-wealthiest city in India after Mumbai and is home to 18 billionaires and 23,000 millionaires. Delhi ranks fifth among the Indian states and union territories in the human development index. Delhi has the second-highest GDP per capita in India. Furthermore, it is considered one of the world’s most polluted cities by particulate matter concentration

2. Mumbai

Mumbai also known as Bombay is the capital city of the Indian state of Maharashtra. According to United Nations, as of 2018, Mumbai was the second most populous city in India after Delhi and the seventh most populous city in the world with a population of 19.98 million. As per the Indian government population census of 2011, Mumbai was the most populous city in India with an estimated city-proper population of 12.5 million living under Municipal Corporation of Greater Mumbai. Mumbai is the center of the Mumbai Metropolitan Region, the sixth most populous metropolitan area in the world with a population of over 23.64 million. Mumbai lies on the Konkan coast on the west coast of India and has a deep natural harbor. In 2008, Mumbai was named an alpha world city. It is also the wealthiest city in India and has the highest number of millionaires and billionaires among all cities in India. Mumbai is home to three UNESCO World Heritage Sites: the Elephanta Caves, Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Terminus, and the city’s distinctive ensemble of Victorian and Art Deco buildings.

The seven islands that constitute Mumbai were originally home to communities of Marathi language-speaking Koli people, who originated in Gujarat in prehistoric times. For centuries, the islands were under the control of successive indigenous empires before being ceded to the Portuguese Empire and subsequently to the East India Company when in 1661 Charles II of England married Catherine of Braganza and as part of her dowry, Charles received the ports of Tangier and Seven Islands of Bombay. During the mid-18th century, Bombay was reshaped by the Hornby Vellard project, which undertook reclamation of the area between the seven islands from the sea. Along with construction of major roads and railways, the reclamation project, completed in 1845, transformed Bombay into a major seaport on the Arabian Sea. Bombay in the 19th century was characterised by economic and educational development. During the early 20th century it became a strong base for the Indian independence movement. Upon India’s independence in 1947 the city was incorporated into Bombay State. In 1960, following the Samyukta Maharashtra Movement, a new state of Maharashtra was created with Bombay as the capital.

3. Kolkata

Kolkata is also known as Calcutta is the capital of the Indian state of West Bengal. According to the 2011 Indian census, it is the seventh most populous city; the city had a population of 4.5 million, while the suburb population brought the total to 14.1 million, making it the third-most populous metropolitan area in India. Kolkata Megalopolis is the area surrounding Kolkata Metropolitan city with an additional population. Located on the east bank of the Hooghly River approximately 80 kilometers (50 mi) west of the border with Bangladesh, it is the principal commercial, cultural, and educational center of East India, while the Port of Kolkata is India’s oldest operating port and its sole major riverine port. The city, nicknamed the “City of Joy” is widely regarded as the “cultural capital” of India and as of 2019, 6 Nobel Laureates have been associated with the city. Recent estimates of Kolkata Metropolitan Area’s economy have ranged from $60 to $150 billion making it the third most-productive metropolitan area in India, after Mumbai and Delhi.

In the late 17th century, the three villages that predated Calcutta were ruled by the Nawab of Bengal under Mughal suzerainty. After the Nawab granted the East India Company a trading license in 1690, the area was developed by the Company into an increasingly fortified trading post. Nawab Siraj ud-Daulah occupied Calcutta in 1756, and the East India Company retook it the following year. In 1793 the East India company was strong enough to abolish Nizamat (local rule) and assumed full sovereignty of the region. Under the company rule, and later under the British Raj, Calcutta served as the capital of British-held territories in India until 1911, when its perceived geographical disadvantages, combined with growing nationalism in Bengal, led to a shift of the capital to New Delhi. Calcutta was the center for the Indian independence movement; it remains a hotbed of contemporary state politics. Following Indian independence in 1947, Kolkata, which was once the center of modern Indian education, science, culture, and politics, suffered several decades of economic stagnation.

4. Chennai

Chennai is also known as Madras, is the capital of the Indian state of Tamil Nadu. Located on the Coromandel Coast off the Bay of Bengal, it is the biggest cultural, economic and educational center of south India. According to the 2011 Indian census, it is the sixth-most populous city and fourth-most populous urban agglomeration in India. The city together with the adjoining regions constitutes the Chennai Metropolitan Area, which is the 36th-largest urban area by population in the world. Chennai is among the most-visited Indian cities by foreign tourists. It was ranked the 43rd-most visited city in the world for the year 2015. The Quality of Living Survey rated Chennai as the safest city in India. Chennai attracts 45 percent of health tourists visiting India and 30 to 40 percent of domestic health tourists. As such, it is termed “India’s health capital”. As a growing metropolitan city in a developing country, Chennai confronts substantial pollution, as well as other logistical and socio-economic problems.

Chennai had the third-largest expatriate population in India, at 35,000 in 2009, 82,790 in 2011 and estimated at over 100,000 by 2016. Tourism-guide publisher Lonely Planet named Chennai as one of the top ten cities in the world to visit in 2015. Chennai is ranked as a beta-level city in the Global Cities Index and was ranked the best city in India by India Today in the 2014 annual Indian city survey. In 2015 Chennai was named the “hottest” city (worth visiting, and worth living in for long term) by the BBC, citing the mixture of both modern and traditional values. National Geographic mentioned Chennai as the only South Asian city to feature in its 2015 “Top 10 food cities” list. Chennai was also named the ninth-best cosmopolitan city in the world by Lonely Planet. In October 2017, Chennai was added to the UNESCO Creative Cities Network (UCCN) list for its rich musical tradition.

The Chennai Metropolitan Area is one of the largest municipal economies of India. Chennai is nicknamed “The Detroit of India”, with more than one-third of India’s automobile industry being based in the city. Home to the Tamil film industry, Chennai is also known as a major film production center. Chennai is one of the 100 Indian cities to be developed as a smart city under the Smart Cities Mission.

5. Hyderabad

Hyderabad is the capital and largest city of the Indian state of Telangana and de jure capital of Andhra Pradesh. Occupying 650 square kilometers (250 sq mi) along the banks of the Musi River, located on the Deccan Plateau in the northern part of South India. At an average altitude of 542 meters (1,778 ft), much of Hyderabad is situated on hilly terrain around artificial lakes, including Hussain Sagar lake —predating the city’s founding—north of the city center. Hyderabad City has a population of about 6.9 million, with about 9.7 million in Hyderabad Metropolitan Region, making it the fourth-most populous city and sixth-most populous urban agglomeration in India. With an output of US$74 billion, Hyderabad is the fifth-largest contributor to India’s overall gross domestic product.

In 1591 Qutb Shahi ruler Muhammad Quli Qutb Shah established Hyderabad to extend the capital beyond the fortified Golconda, in 1687 the city was annexed by the Mughals—in 1724 Mughal governor Nizam Asaf Jah I declared his sovereignty and founded the Asaf Jahi dynasty also known as the Nizams, Hyderabad served as the imperial capital of the Asaf Jahi from 1769-1948. As the capital of the princely state of Hyderabad, the city housed the British Residency and cantonment until Indian independence in 1947. Hyderabad was invaded and integrated into the Indian Union in 1948 and continues as a capital of Hyderabad State (1948–56), when States Reorganisation Act of 1956 was introduced Hyderabad was made the capital of the united Andhra Pradesh, in 2014 Telangana state was formed after bifurcation of Andhra—Hyderabad City became a joint capital of the two states, a transitional arrangement scheduled to end in 2025. Since 1956, the city houses the winter office of the President of India.

Relics of the Qutb Shahi and Nizam rules remain visible today; the Charminar has come to symbolize the city. By the end of the early modern era, the Mughal Empire declined in the Deccan and the Nizams’ patronage had attracted men of letters from different parts of the world. The amalgamation of local and migrated artisans had originated a distinctive culture, and the city emerged as the foremost center of oriental culture. Painting, handicraft, jewelry, literature, dialect, clothing, and cuisine (which includes biryani and haleem) and is prominent still today. The Telugu film industry based in the city is the country’s second-largest producer of motion pictures.

So these are some of the famous cities in India.

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